I have an insatiable desire to read.

I just finished The Day I Shot Cupid: Hello, My Name is Jennifer Love Hewitt (JLH) and I’m a Loveaholic. I have to say, it was actually really good. I thought her book was insightful and honest. In truth, I suppose it’s unfair to say “actually” as if I had assumed it wouldn’t be. As the executive producer and director of The Ghost Whisperer, I should have anticipated her skill. Anyway if you’re a woman, I would suggest it. Whether or not that questions my credibility to suggest books to you, I’m not sure but if you read it and hate it, I encourage you to let me know. You may just be surprised.

In flipping through the first few pages, this is how JLH hooked me; she’s describing coming off a breakup and her decision to write the book:

“And there it was, the new relationship that I would begin would be with me, my past, my present, my laughter, my pain, and most important, all of you.”

Kind of sounds like my blog to me.

She goes on to say: “I’m not gonna lie. I have had a few “everything is changing” panic attacks, but I also feel like I’m on the brink of real growth.” Okay, JLH, I’ll relate to that. I’m in.

So here are some things that struck a note with me from her book:

  • “Not my fate obviously.” She writes this with regards to the fact that she would’ve “loved to have met [her] soul mate in fourth grade and never looked back” but it just didn’t happen that way. Totally applicable to relationships, but I think we should adopt this attitude in everything we try to do that doesn’t work out. There are several things I would’ve loved to do or be known for or experienced so far in life. But when work ethic isn’t to blame, there’s nothing to say but “Not my fate obviously.” Why blame ourselves for luck falling short on us? You do what you can do, and then you appreciate the effort you put forth.
  • “We’ve all had breakups, but the worst ones are when someone not only hurts you, but does it in a way that makes you lose respect for them.” Wow. So true.
  • “He probably told you in his own way, or showed you those behaviors six months ago, while you were dressing him up in your mind in a Prince Charming outfit, white horse included, and his words were drowned out by the Bridget Jones soundtrack in your head.” So maybe things aren’t so surprising?
  • “There are a lot of people in the world to be with, and there will always be someone smarter, prettier, or more interesting.” When stated in this manner, doesn’t it sound so simple? Why freak out? If someone chooses to be with you, they choose to be with you. You could drive yourself crazy feeling insecure about every other person and for what? There’s always going to be someone better than you. Are you always going to be insecure?
  • “Some people think it’s the first impression that matters most, but I think it’s the last.”

And finally,

  • Quoted from Harold Lakes: “An act of love that fails is just as much a part of the divine life as an act of love that succeeds, for love is measured by fullness, not by reception.”

If you have the time, I suggest you listen to the following podcast. Whether or not you’re dealing or have dealt with a broken relationship, broken family, failed business, or simply a failed attempt – it will be applicable to you. Take the time to get through the first several minutes of history.

I think this is one of the most helpful things I’ve had the good fortune of stumbling across:

The Sacred Waste

One thought on “I have an insatiable desire to read.

  1. This will sound a bit mad, perhaps, or at least extremely nerdy, but “Not my fate” combined with “Do what you can do, and appreciate your efforts even when luck falls short” reminds me of a line from Beowulf: Wyrd oft nereð unfægne eorl, þonne his ellen deah; that is, “Fate often saves an undoomed man, when his courage holds.” It’s one of those funny recursive Anglo-Saxon lines: if a man is “undoomed,” then Fate has already saved him – but only so long as his courage is good. If you’re in battle and things look rough, and you give up instead of attempting to slog it out, of course Fate won’t smile on you. As you note, it’s a useful attitude in so many other spheres of life: relationships, internships or jobs, sports, deadlines…

    Admittedly, Beowulf’s technically saying something different than JLH and you are saying; sometimes the undoomed man retains his courage and Fate dooms him anyway. But “often” it pays off.

    Therefore, may your courage hold! Good luck with the paper you’re working on, miss.

    PS – Haven’t checked out the podcast yet, but I shall. Thanks for sharing things!

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